Date

12-2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in most developed countries and imparts a massive clinical burden. Numerous devices have been developed to treat cardiovascular conditions, and millions of blood-contacting devices are used worldwide every year. However, unacceptably high rates of thrombosis have precluded the clinical use of numerous devices, such as a small diameter vascular graft or an artificial venous valve. Inspired by the function of the endothelium, the natural lining of blood vessels, this work utilized multiple strategies to incorporate biologically-active modifications onto vascular biomaterials to interact with blood cells and proteins in an attempt to reduce material-induced thrombosis. Work in this thesis characterizes the cellular phenotype of a novel progenitor-derived endothelial-like cell, two in vivo assessments of bioprosthetic venous valve endothelialization, the hemocompatibility consequences of crosslinking a decellularized matrix, and a novel modification of decellularized matrix for protein C activation. This dissertation describes novel biomaterials designed for vascular applications for the advancement of cardiovascular medicine.

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M49G5KR7

School

School of Medicine

Available for download on Monday, December 24, 2018

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