Date

April 2010

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

To address the limited understanding of person-centered care as it occurs at the level of hands-on care, videotaped interactions between certified nursing assistant caregivers and people with dementia during morning care were examined to establish those interactions that were uniquely person-centered. Following observation and description of both verbal and nonverbal interaction aspects of video-recorded episodes of morning care, qualitative description analysis methods were used to identify those interactions which were uniquely person-centered. After coding and analyzing six episodes, five interaction categories were identified from 116 caregiver-specific codes. These were 1) Seeking Guidance, 2) Validating Satisfaction, 3) Clarifying Ambiguity, 4) Negotiating Resistance, and 5) Adjusting Care. Each were determined to be necessary in person-centered caregiving based on the critical attributes of person-centered care discussed in the literature. Additionally, eight nonverbal principles of interaction, labeled Respecting Individuality, were identified. These principles provide a contextual foundation for the delivery of person-centered care. The results of this theory-building study are depicted in a conceptual model representing findings that are both clinically and theoretically meaningful to the practice and understanding of person-centered care during caregiving for the person with dementia.

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M4T43R1B

School

School of Nursing

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