Date

5-1-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Dept. of Behavioral Neuroscience

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Methamphetamine (MA) is a highly addictive central nervous system psychomotor stimulant. In America, MA became popular in the 1940s when it was administered to World War II soldiers to promote wakefulness and fight fatigue, effects that are common among all psychomotor stimulants (Gilman, Rall, Nies, & Taylor, 1993; Gonzales, Mooney, & Rawson, 2010). Production and use of MA for non-medical purposes began to rise in the 1960s and in response to this increase MA was eventually classified as a Schedule II drug by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (Gettig, Grady, & Nowosadzka, 2006; Gonzales et al., 2010; NIDA, 2010). MA has a high abuse potential compared to other psychomotor stimulants, likely due in part to its long half-life, its high lipid solubility making transfer across the blood-brain barrier relatively easy, and the fact that MA is metabolized into another active psychomotor stimulant, amphetamine (AMPH), prior to excretion (Barr et al., 2006; Cruickshank & Dyer

Comments

This document has been embargoed indefinitely and consequently is not available in full text electronic format. A circulating bound text of the document is available in the stacks of the Library.

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M4DB7ZT0

School

School of Medicine

Available for download on Friday, December 31, 9999

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