Date

9-1-2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Dept. of Behavioral Neuroscience

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Initial sensitivity to the stimulant effects of alcohol may be a risk factor for developing alcohol (ethanol) use disorders. The FAST and SLOW selectively bred mouse lines were developed as a model of extreme sensitivity (FAST) and insensitivity (SLOW) to the locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol, and differ at genetic loci that influence the stimulant response to acute ethanol injection. A challenge has been identifying the relevant genes. A main purpose of this dissertation was to investigate whether the muscarinic acetylcholinergic system differs between FAST and SLOW mice, and could play a role in their differential sensitivity to ethanol. FAST mice had been previously investigated for their response to the peripheral administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, and ethanol. The first study in this thesis investigated this drug combination in SLOW mice. SLOW-1 and -2 mice were differentially sensitive to the depressant effects of ethanol, but the results seen followin

Comments

This document has been embargoed indefinitely and consequently is not available in full text electronic format. A circulating bound text of the document is available in the stacks of the Library.

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M4JW8BV4

School

School of Medicine

Available for download on Friday, December 31, 9999

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