Author

Aiping Liu

Date

June 2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

The biomechanical environment (e.g., stresses and strains) of embryonic cardiac cells plays an important role in regulating intrinsic genetic programming of these cells. Disturbances in the biomechanical environment have been associated with congenital heart diseases, which affect 36,000 newborns each year in the US. However, the underlying mechanisms by which the biomechanical environment affects heart development remain unclear, partly due to the lack of quantitative knowledge about the biomechanical environment the cardiac cells experience in the living embryonic heart. To study the role of the biomechanical environment in early heart development, Hamilton Hamburg (HH) stage 18 chick embryos were used as the animal model for early heart development in this thesis. An intervention procedure performed on chick embryos, outflow tract banding (OTB), was used to reproduce disturbances in the biomechanical environment that lead to heart defects. Specifically, we focused on the dynamic bio

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M4000035

School

School of Medicine

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