Date

August 2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.P.H.

Department

Dept. of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Objective: This study investigates whether older adults have increased odds of self-reported depression in the presence of self-reported pain and whether these odds of depression differ for males and females. Methods: A historical cohort survey using 75,015 Medicare managed care enrollees who responded to the Health Outcomes Survey. Enrollees who reported pain at baseline and at follow-up two years later were compared to enrollees who reported no pain at both time points. All enrollees were assessed for positive depression screens at follow-up. Results: There are increased odds of self-reported depression for both males and females who self-report pain, even after controlling for age, race, education, smoking, cancer treatment, and SF-36 mental and physical health domains. Males are 93 percent more likely to report depression in the presence of pain than in the absence (OR 1.93, 95% CI: 2.0-2.0), while females are 59 percent more likely to report depression in the presence of pain than

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M47942PD

School

School of Medicine

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