Date

March 2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Significance of the problem. Vietnamese American women (VAW) (U.S.-born and immigrants) are diagnosed with cervical cancer and die at rates twice that of non-Hispanic White women and the highest of all larger Asian ethnic subgroups and presented with later stage (regional) cervical cancer than non-Hispanic White, Korean, and Japanese women. A Papanicolaou (Pap) test screens for pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions of the cervix. Across studies, only 37-80% of VAW reported ever having a Pap test on at least one occasion, and 68% reported having a Pap test in the past three years. These screening rates are low compared to the Healthy People 2010 Objectives. Vietnamese immigrant women (VIW) as a group (non U.S.-born) may hold different health beliefs about Pap testing than women with other backgrounds; may encounter cultural barriers to engaging in cancer screening; may not participate because of worry about confidentiality issues in obtaining a Pap test; and their view of the quality care

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M4QC01GT

School

School of Nursing

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