Date

November 2011

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.P.H.

Department

Dept. of Public Health and Preventive Medicine

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Background – Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths and the third most common cancer in both men and women within the U.S. American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population. The calculation of cancer incidence, mortality, and survival for an overall AI/AN population in the U.S. obscures the heterogeneity in cancer burden within the AI/AN population at local or regional levels. Studies at state and regional levels have documented variation in colorectal cancer mortality within the AI/AN population. AI/AN people have also been reported to be more likely to be diagnosed at later stages of colorectal cancer as well as having a greater risk of colorectal cancer mortality than non-Hispanic White people. Local level or regional data on cancer survival are more informative for state and tribal communities in the development of strategies for the control of cancer. Methods – Using data with improved AI/AN racial ascertainment from record linkages performed bet

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M46971J1

School

School of Medicine

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