Author

Ruth White

Date

July 2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Dept. of Cell and Developmental Biology

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Tumor-initating cells (TICs) are operationally defined as tumor cells with the ability to initiate tumor formation upon grafting into immunocompromised mice. TICs have been characterized as drug resistant and as possible sources of metastatic cells, although the latter function is poorly understood. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of these cells in metastasis, we have studied TICs from a mouse model of skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) initiated by activation of Kras and inactivation of Smad4 in the hair follicle bulge stem cells. These mice develop tumors that are metastatic to the lung. Lung metastasis in this model was shown to be greatly increased by xenografting (passaging) the tumors. Two TIC populations were defined within this tumor model, the Hoechst dye excluding side population (SP) and the SP[superscript -]/CD34[superscript +]/CD49f[superscript +] population. We observed that the size of the SP, but not the SP[superscript -]/CD34[superscript +]/CD49f[su

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M44F1NQ6

School

School of Medicine

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