Date

November 2011

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Dept. of Behavioral Neuroscience

Institution

Oregon Health & Science University

Abstract

Exposure to radiation can lead to deficits in cognitive function, including impairments in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. However, not all individuals exposed to irradiation develop cognitive impairments, suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a protein important for neuronal repair, might influence susceptibility to developing radiation-induced cognitive impairments. Humans express three major apoE isoforms, apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4. Compared to apoE3, apoE4 increases the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease while apoE2 decreases this risk. ApoE4 is also associated with cognitive deficits following neurotrauma. Moreover, deficiency of apolipoprotein E (apoE) in mice worsens cognitive impairments following irradiation. There might also be sex differences in the risk for developing radiation-induced cognitive impairments. In both humans and rodents, females are more susceptible to the effects of irradiation on cognition than males. The neur

Identifier

doi:10.6083/M49Z92W5

School

School of Medicine

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